Myth Busting Bell Helicopter Q & A

Myth Busting the Bell Community Q&A – Part 1 of a series.
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(Bell Quotes in black.  Responses in blue.)

“We have considered a route west of I-35, however there is a lack of large roads to fly over to mitigate the noise impact of our operations to the west.”
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There are few roads west of Alliance because there is *nothing* there other than a freight yard and open fields – that’s why the FAA recommended helicopter route ‘Intermodal’ is west of AFW.

There is FM 156 – but I guess Bell doesn’t consider that a ‘large road’ such as the Rufe Snow Expressway…

http://www.bellhelicopter.com/…/april-2017-noise-community-…

faa recommended route

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Myth Busting the Bell Community Q&A –  part 2 of a series

“Why can’t our pilots fly higher into Class B airspace?
Class B airspace exists to protect commercial aircraft traffic. As a safety precaution and to ensure our operations do not tax DFW air traffic control, Bell Helicopter will not repeatedly enter Class B airspace.”

Aircraft departing DFW in a north flow cross waypoint KMART northwest of Southlake at or above 5500′. Aircraft landing DFW in a south flow are kept above 5000′ until passing north of Highway 114. A helicopter at 3000′ over Keller would not be a factor to DFW traffic.
DFW airport had 55,967 operations in March 2017 – 25 helicopters per day will not ‘tax DFW air traffic control’.
Aircraft operating within the DFW class B are under positive radar control and safer than uncontrolled VFR aircraft squeezing in underneath the class B, and between AFW and DFW airspaces.

helicopter drawing
helicopter map
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Myth Busting the Bell Community Q&A – Part 3 of a series

“When possible, louder twin-engine training helicopter (Bell 412 and 429) operations are being rerouted to Arlington and Fort Worth/Meacham airports for training, reducing both the volume and noise of our operations along the current flight path”.
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Flighttracker24 shows the majority of flight over Keller are 412s and 428s, with some 407s.

Note the altitude and speed in the screenshot – as a reminder the elevation in north Keller is between 700′ and 800′ which places this aircraft around 700′. This was on a clear day (May 15).

Also, Bell procedures call for a maximum airspeed of 105 kts and a minimum of 1750′ over noise sensitive areas. If you zoom in you can observe the helicopter did not follow Rufe Snow and is flying directly over Stagecoach Hills airport.

Myth Busting the Bell Community Q&A – Part 4 of a series

“Bell Helicopter strives to fly in a manner that lessens the noise impact and is making every effort to “fly
neighborly” over roadways when available”.

The Helicopter Association International manufactuer’s recommended noise abatement procedures website states Bell procedures for 429 series are 105 kts maximum airspeed and 1750′ minimum altitude:

https://www.rotor.org/Resources/NoiseAbatementProcedures.aspx

MANUFACTURER’S RECOMMENDED NOISE ABATEMENT PROCEDURES. Note: For Models not quoted, contact the Manufacturer – contact information is available in the HAI Helicopter …

http://new.rotor.com/portals/1/bell/bell427_429.pdf

Bell procedures for 407 series are 105 kts maximum airspeed and 1500′ minimum altitude:

https://www.rotor.org/Resources/NoiseAbatementProcedures/Bell407.aspx?PageContentID=74

The screenshot was taken on May 16, 2017. The twin engine 429 is flying at 189 kts at 900′ AGL. The speed and altitude appeared accurate by observation – it was very low, very fast, and very loud.

Bell pilots can’t even be bothered to follow Bell’s own procedures – that is how little Bell thinks of Keller. 

helicopter screen shot

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Myth Busting the Bell Community Q&A – part 5 of a series

“Bell Helicopter operates well above these minimums at 1,800 ft. MSL when available ”

Maybe in some areas – but the floor of the DFW class B is at 2,000′ MSL over Keller. Operating at 1,800′ MSL is certainly possibly, but Bell pilots are apparently reluctant to fly that close to the limit with student pilots. The average flight over Keller is at 1,500′ MSL, which 700′-800′ AGL.

The Helicopter Association International manufactuer’s recommended noise abatement procedures website states Bell procedures for 429 series are 105 kts maximum airspeed and 1750′ minimum altitude:

https://www.rotor.org/Resources/NoiseAbatementProcedures.aspx

MANUFACTURER’S RECOMMENDED NOISE ABATEMENT PROCEDURES. Note: For Models not quoted, contact the Manufacturer – contact information is available in the HAI Helicopter …

http://new.rotor.com/portals/1/bell/bell427_429.pdf

Bell procedures for 407 series are 105 kts maximum airspeed and 1500′ minimum altitude:

https://www.rotor.org/Resources/NoiseAbatementProcedures/Bell407.aspx?PageContentID=74

http://www.bellhelicopter.com/~/media/bell/documents/company/april-2017-noise-community-qa.ashx?la=en

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